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Lynchwood Christian Church

A Community Called By Christ Working to do Good in the World Through Fellowship, Devotion, and Service. What do we mean by Fellowship? We are a community of friends who like to eat together, tell stories, pray for one another, worship together, and welcome others. We celebrate anniversaries and Birthdays, cry together, show up at the important times, and hold one another close through all of life's ups and downs. What do we mean by Devotion? We worship together, study together, pray together. We engage the bible critically, drawing on the 2000 years of Christian seekers, as well as modern day scholarship to try to understand what it means to be a person of faith. We accept that there are no absolutely right answers and there are no dumb questions. And we remain dedicated to the way of Jesus Christ, seeking reconciliation, forgiveness, love, and grace in relationships. What do we mean by Service? We take great pride in service collecting goods for the homeless, assisting the teachers and students at Lynch Wood Elementary to prepare for the school year, and tithing our collective financial resources. We practice generosity with our neighbors, knowing that the Gospel is Good News for all people. And we practice grace knowing that it was God who invited us to the table so that we might be able to invite others.
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church2 weeks ago
Second Sunday Lunch bunch at Black Bear Diner. Look at this group!
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church3 weeks ago
This coming Sunday, We're wrapping up our "New Beginnings" sermon series with: "'Is He out of his mind?' and other things they said about Jesus."

Transformation requires that we do some metaphorical "coloring outside the lines." No one does this better than Jesus in the Gospels, whose work and teachings are often so transgressive that people question whether he might be out of his mind.
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church added 2 new photos.4 weeks ago
Communion for Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice today in Sheridan.
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church4 weeks ago
*The following announcement was sent out by email this morning*

Greetings,

If you've been following the news you've heard about the separation of migrant children from their families on the United States border. It has been a time in which many of us have felt helpless. Scripture reminds us over and over again that we are to treat the stranger in their land with the same respect and dignity we would a citizen. And yet, not far from our doorsteps people are being treated as less than human. There are currently 123 men being housed in the federal prison in Sheridan, OR awaiting a ruling ragrding asylum*. They have been separated from their wives and children, and are worried they may be deported and never see their families again.

This past Monday 1200 people of faith from across Oregon gathered in Sheridan to demand access to those being held and to call for an end to the current "zero tolerance" policy of the federal government. Following this massive and powerful showing a call has been made by churches and faith organizations across the state to join together in worship this coming Sunday morning in Sheridan.

I'm going to Sheridan on Sunday morning because my faith tells me that it is in visiting the stranger that I will encounter Christ. (Matthew 25) Anyone who would like to join me is welcome to come. Information about directions and there the service will be is below in a letter I am attaching from Interfaith Immigrant and Refugee Justice (IMIRJ.)

We will still have worship on Sunday at Lynchwood. Cindy will be leading a hymn sing in place of the sermon, and the Sass family will be in town from Seattle to provide special music. If you have any other questions, please feel free to reach out to me.

In th Peace of Christ,

Pastor Andrew

*Federal Law (8 U.S. Code § 1158) provides a path for people to declare a need for asylum due to circumstances in their home country in which their lives are in danger, but requires that the person filing for asylum be in the U.S. These people cross the border, turned themselves into the authorities, and requested asylum using the legal means. In other words, the people being held in Sheridan have not broken any laws; they are simply waiting for a decsion to be made about the status of their asylum.

Letter from IMIRJ:

Dear Friends,

This last week Attorney General Jeff Sessions invoked Romans 13 to validate the amoral separation of immigrant children from their families, and now (as noted by our Christian Elders at "reclaimingjesus.org") people are watching and waiting to see what our churches will say and do. Today you might be tempted to exhale given President Trump's Executive Order, but we know that our broken immigration system has been separating families long before this moment, and that it will continue to do so if our laws remained unchanged. Likewise, we know that this administration in particular must be held accountable for its public rhetoric, and here in Oregon that means gaining direct access (so far denied) to immigrant detainees being held at the Federal Correctional Institution in Sheridan, OR.
So, as announced at the Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice (IMIrJ) press conference earlier today, we will be holding a public worship service this Sunday morning (6/24) at 11:00 am, just outside the Sheridan Prison. Main Parking at Sheridan High School (433 S Bridge St, Sheridan, OR 97378)

For our communities of faith, this can no longer be a time for "business as usual." We realize that this is short notice, and that it is very difficult and disruptive to change our usual Sunday routines with so little lead time. But given the nature of this national crisis of faith, we believe that difficult disruptions are now called for, and we are asking all faith leaders and faith communities throughout Oregon to join us in Sheridan for this special moment of prayer-in-action. As of the sending of this letter, ten churches have committed to participating in some way with a Sunday worship service in Sheridan (for our initial list of participants, see below). In some cases the service at their usual house of worship has been canceled entirely, in others a loose "bare bones" service will remain. But all have committed to handing out this letter to help interpret this dramatic break from business as usual, and it's our hope and prayer that others will join us in this important gesture (for more faith resources to help interpret this moment to your communities, check out reclaimingjesus.org).

Our Sunday Service in Sheridan (called "The Road to Sheridan: Love Leads Us") will include all the traditional worship elements (communion, prayer, music, sermon, etc.), but it will also include a direct ask of the Prison to allow ongoing clergy access to detainees so they can receive the pastoral care they need and have requested - and so that we can learn more about how they are being treated and whether or not they are being reunited with their children, spouses and other family. If you'd like to participate on Sunday, let us know by emailing ron@imirj.org, but otherwise just plan on showing up on time. Note that bringing your own chairs or blankets would be very helpful, and packing your own sack lunch might be a good idea. But all the other liturgical logistics will be taken care of, and we look forward to seeing you there.

In faith and prayer for immigrant families and for our country,
Rev. Chris Craun, St. Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church
Rev. Michael Ellick, First Congregational United Church of Christ
Rev. Josh Kingsley, First Methodist Church, Portland
Rev. Nathan LeRud, Trinity Episopal Cathedral
Rev. Maria McDowell, St. Philip the Deacon Episcopal Church
Rev. Melissa Reed, Salt & Light Lutheran Church
Rev. Kerlin Richter, Saint David of Wales Episcopal Church
Rev. Dr. Sara Rosneau, Waverly Heights United Church of Christ
Rev. Audrey Schindler, First Presbyterian, Portland
Rev. Tara Wilkins, Bridgeport United Church of Christ
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church1 month ago
"Tradition is the living faith of the dead. Traditionalism is the dead faith of the living." Jaroslav Pelikan.

The line between passing down wisdom to the next generation, or dictating how things ought to be done is difficult to navigate. The former adds life to what will be, while the latter, risks stifling the spirits work.

This Sunday we'll be talking about the story in which the seasoned prophet Eli has to walk this line to both guide and make space for Samuel to hear the voice of God.

Join us for week 5 of our sermon series "New Beginnings"
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church1 month ago
On Wednesday night we'll be watching the movie "Come Sunday," which tells the true story of Bishop Carlton Pearson, and the controversy that ensued within his church when he discerned from God that there is no hell.

The movie is based on an episode of the popular radio show and podcast This American Life. Click below if you want to listen to the show:

https://www.thisamericanlife.org/304/heretics

How to Get Here

Lynchwood is located in South East Portland on 174th Avenue between Powell and Division.  We’re easy to find; just look for the big red chalice and the 3 crosses!

Once you get here you’ll find parking in the back. After you enter the double doors you’ll be greeted by a warm group of people who will gladly lead you to the sanctuary.

If you visit during the week, you’ll find the church office on the front of the building. There are  parking spaces right as you enter the driveway on the north side of the building.

Driving Directions: 

Coming from the west:

Head east on Powell and make a left on 174th. The church will be on your left after a block

or

Head east on Division and make a right on 174th. The church will be on your right in about 3/4 of a mile.

Coming from the east:

Head west on Powell and make a right on 174th. The church will be on your left after a block.

or

Head west on Division and make a left on 174th. The church will be on your right after 3/4 of a mile.

Who We Are

We are a congregation located in East Portland.

We are a friendly community who likes to eat together, tell stories, pray for one another, worship together, and welcome others. We celebrate anniversaries and Birthdays, cry together, show up at the important times, and hold one another close through all of life’s ups and downs

We worship together, study together, pray together. We engage the bible critically, drawing on the 2000 years of Christian seekers, as well as modern day scholarship to try to understand what it means to be a person of faith. We accept that there are no absolutely right answers and there are no dumb questions. And we remain dedicated to the way of Jesus Christ, seeking reconciliation, forgiveness, love, and grace in relationships.

We take great pride in service collecting goods for the homeless, assisting the teachers and students at Lynch Wood Elementary to prepare for the school year, and tithing our collective financial resources. We practice generosity with our neighbors, knowing that the Gospel is Good News for all people. And we practice grace knowing that it was God who invited us to the table so that we might be able to invite others.

 

We are members of a progressive mainline denomination known as the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

We are also part of the Christian Church in Oregon and Southwest Idaho, one of the 33 regions of the Disciples of Christ.

What We Believe

As members of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) we celebrate the unity of the church and the freedom of the believer. We believe that each individual is led by the spirit, and that every person has the ability to come to their own conclusions as they seek to understand the truth of God in Jesus. Therefore, we don’t tell people what they have to believe. We do, however, celebrate difference in belief. Part of what makes the Disciples (as we’re often called) so unique is the presence of many differing opinions. We expect to be both challenged and enriched by this diversity.

As Disciples, we practice believers baptism by immersion, meaning that children are baptized when they reach an age when they can make their own decision about faith. After taking classes with the pastor, they are “dunked” in a pool of water during worship once they have made a public confession of faith.

We also practice communion every Sunday. This is a sign of our belief in the unity of the church. It is also a sign of our belief in the freedom of each person: no one is barred from the table. The communion table doesn’t belong to us; it belongs to God. Feel free to partake of the bread and the juice as you feel comfortable.