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Lynchwood Christian Church

A Community Called By Christ Working to do Good in the World Through Fellowship, Devotion, and Service. What do we mean by Fellowship? We are a community of friends who like to eat together, tell stories, pray for one another, worship together, and welcome others. We celebrate anniversaries and Birthdays, cry together, show up at the important times, and hold one another close through all of life's ups and downs. What do we mean by Devotion? We worship together, study together, pray together. We engage the bible critically, drawing on the 2000 years of Christian seekers, as well as modern day scholarship to try to understand what it means to be a person of faith. We accept that there are no absolutely right answers and there are no dumb questions. And we remain dedicated to the way of Jesus Christ, seeking reconciliation, forgiveness, love, and grace in relationships. What do we mean by Service? We take great pride in service collecting goods for the homeless, assisting the teachers and students at Lynch Wood Elementary to prepare for the school year, and tithing our collective financial resources. We practice generosity with our neighbors, knowing that the Gospel is Good News for all people. And we practice grace knowing that it was God who invited us to the table so that we might be able to invite others.
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church2 weeks ago
This begs the question, how are your prayers changing the way you live today?

"Regardless of what anyone believes (or doesn’t) about God, I ache for us all to step into the space that listens with full hearts and a willingness to change.

I will always pray for love to visit people in pain, for wisdom to guide us as we seek to transform our world, and for the courage to show up for my fellow human beings in every way I can.

Sometimes we need grace and wisdom and love bigger than our own to navigate the uncertainty and insecurity of the moment until we know what to do next.

Twitter can call that a fantasy, but I call that humanity at its best"
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church3 weeks ago
A Peom by the 13th centuey Christian Mystic Meister Eckhart:

When I Was The Forest

When I was the stream, when I was the
forest, when I was still the field
when I was every hoof, foot,
fin and wing, when I
was the sky itself,

no one ever asked me did I have a purpose, no one ever
wondered was there anything I might need,
for there was nothing
I could not love.

It was when I left all we once were that
the agony began, the fear and questions came,
and I wept, I wept. And tears
I had never known before.

So I returned to the river, I returned to
the mountains. I asked for their hand in marriage again,
I begged—I begged to wed every object and creature,

and when they accepted,
God was ever present in my arms.
And He did not say,
“Where have you
been?”

For then I knew my soul—every soul—
has always held
Him.
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church added 4 new photos.3 weeks ago
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church added 30 new photos — with Victoria Redmond-Weigant.3 weeks ago
Such a great day! We are so happy that you came!
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church3 weeks ago
Holy Week food for thought:

"Myth No. 3: Jesus’ Last Supper was a Passover Seder

The Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke assert that the Last Supper took place on the first night of Passover. As such, some Christians are attracted to contemporary observance; some churches even hold “Christian Seders” in an attempt to practice the religion of Jesus.

However, it’s pretty unlikely that Jesus participated in a Seder. When the Second Temple in Jerusalem stood, the first night of Passover usually involved just eating the paschal sacrifice, a lamb that had been slaughtered at the temple and then roasted and served at home. The temple was destroyed several decades after Jesus’ death. There are no descriptions of the Seder or the Haggadah — the text that guides the Seder ritual now — from major historical authors or works detailing Passover observance during the time of the Second Temple, such as Philo of Alexandria, Josephus, the Book of Jubilees or the Elephantine “Passover Papyrus.” We first see mention of them in early Rabbinic texts like the Mishnah and the Tosefta , which can be tricky to date, as they originated as oral traditions.

Parts of the Seder might have begun to take root during Jesus’ lifetime, but there’s no evidence that they were widespread or developed enough that he would have participated in them"
Lynchwood Christian Church
Lynchwood Christian Church shared their post.3 weeks ago
Easter is this Sunday! Service is at 10am.

How to Get Here

Lynchwood is located in South East Portland on 174th Avenue between Powell and Division.  We’re easy to find; just look for the big red chalice and the 3 crosses!

Once you get here you’ll find parking in the back. After you enter the double doors you’ll be greeted by a warm group of people who will gladly lead you to the sanctuary.

If you visit during the week, you’ll find the church office on the front of the building. There are  parking spaces right as you enter the driveway on the north side of the building.

Driving Directions: 

Coming from the west:

Head east on Powell and make a left on 174th. The church will be on your left after a block

or

Head east on Division and make a right on 174th. The church will be on your right in about 3/4 of a mile.

Coming from the east:

Head west on Powell and make a right on 174th. The church will be on your left after a block.

or

Head west on Division and make a left on 174th. The church will be on your right after 3/4 of a mile.

Who We Are

We are a congregation located in East Portland.

We are a friendly community who likes to eat together, tell stories, pray for one another, worship together, and welcome others. We celebrate anniversaries and Birthdays, cry together, show up at the important times, and hold one another close through all of life’s ups and downs

We worship together, study together, pray together. We engage the bible critically, drawing on the 2000 years of Christian seekers, as well as modern day scholarship to try to understand what it means to be a person of faith. We accept that there are no absolutely right answers and there are no dumb questions. And we remain dedicated to the way of Jesus Christ, seeking reconciliation, forgiveness, love, and grace in relationships.

We take great pride in service collecting goods for the homeless, assisting the teachers and students at Lynch Wood Elementary to prepare for the school year, and tithing our collective financial resources. We practice generosity with our neighbors, knowing that the Gospel is Good News for all people. And we practice grace knowing that it was God who invited us to the table so that we might be able to invite others.

 

We are members of a progressive mainline denomination known as the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

We are also part of the Christian Church in Oregon and Southwest Idaho, one of the 33 regions of the Disciples of Christ.

What We Believe

As members of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) we celebrate the unity of the church and the freedom of the believer. We believe that each individual is led by the spirit, and that every person has the ability to come to their own conclusions as they seek to understand the truth of God in Jesus. Therefore, we don’t tell people what they have to believe. We do, however, celebrate difference in belief. Part of what makes the Disciples (as we’re often called) so unique is the presence of many differing opinions. We expect to be both challenged and enriched by this diversity.

As Disciples, we practice believers baptism by immersion, meaning that children are baptized when they reach an age when they can make their own decision about faith. After taking classes with the pastor, they are “dunked” in a pool of water during worship once they have made a public confession of faith.

We also practice communion every Sunday. This is a sign of our belief in the unity of the church. It is also a sign of our belief in the freedom of each person: no one is barred from the table. The communion table doesn’t belong to us; it belongs to God. Feel free to partake of the bread and the juice as you feel comfortable.